Casio PX-760 BK Privia Digital Home Piano Review

Replacing the older Casio PX750, the Casio PX760 features a largely-unchanged cabinet design, finish colors, panel layout, internal sound system and some functions like its predecessor. However, the PX760 has some additional features added and also some improvements which makes it a digital piano worth considering.

Features of the Casio PX760 BK Privia Digital Home Piano, Black:

  • 88-note, Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer action II keyboard. Designed to replicate the same size and keyboard action as an acoustic piano, the lower keys are heavier and become lighter as the keys get higher. Ebony and ivory textured keys are also added for a more realistic acoustic piano feel. Three sensors are provided for each key that detect the intensity with which the key is struck to replicate how a grand piano responds.
  • Acoustic and Intelligence Resonator (AiR) Sound Source. To replicate the sound of the finest acoustic grand pianos, the AiR processor uses grand piano samples recorded at four dynamics sampling to produce grand piano sounds with long natural decays and expression. With three times the memory of previous Privia versions, the Air processor simulates the sound of the open strings when the dampers are raised by the pedal.
  • Damper Resonance. Provides the rich sound of the strings when the sustain pedal is used.
  • Hammer Response. Mimicking an acoustic piano‚Äôs delay between striking the key and the sounding of the string directly affects the pitch and striking intensity of the keyboard.
  • 128-note polyphony. This is the number of tones or voices that an instrument can generate at the same time. This capability is significant when playing on an advanced level or using pedals or timbres at the same time.
  • Built-in three-pedal unit. A classic pedal unit similar to most upright or grand pianos: 1x damper pedal, 1x sostenuto pedal and 1x soft pedal.
  • Other functions.
  • Split mode. This allows the pianist to play two different instrument sounds on each hand within a keyboard to give the effect of different instruments being played simultaneously at once.
  • Layer mode. This allows the pianist to be able to play two different sounds simultaneously on one key.
  • Duet mode. With this mode, you can divide the keyboard into two separate keyboards with the same octave which is useful for piano lessons.
  • New and improved features. Improved upgrades for the sound quality include a more realistic professional-quality sounding instruments, such as improved strings and electric pianos. Concert play is also an added feature which includes a music library that features 10 classical songs you can play along with. However, this added feature requires the user to be able to read music to be able to play along.

Pros

  • A true upgrade from its predecessor (the Casio PX750).
  • Allows enhancement of user experience through USB connections that enable iPad and iPhone connection to apps.
  • Features a Split Mode that allows users to play different instrument sounds on each hand within the keyboard. Duet mode splits the keyboard into two separate keyboards on the same chromatic scale. Layer mode allows 2 different sounds to be simultaneously to be played on one key.

Cons

  • Quite heavy

Verdict

Relatively low-priced considering the features it has to offer and is of high quality, making it a worthwhile buy.

Product Comparison

Product Casio PX760 BK Privia Digital Piano Yamaha DGX650B Digital Piano Casio Privia PX-160CSU Digital Piano W/Stand
Price $ 699.00 $ 749.99 $ 549.00
Amazon Rating 4.8 4.7 None
Dimension 59 x 15 x 17 inches 58.9 x 21.5 x 12.8 inches 58 x 13.5 x 15 inches
Weight 85 pounds 83.6 pounds 21 pounds
Warranty 3 years 1 year 3 years
Features
  • 88-note, Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer action II keyboard
  • Acoustic and Intelligence Resonator (AiR) Sound Source
  • Damper Resonance
  • USB interface (PC)
  • Hammer Response
  • Built-in three-pedal board.
  • 128-Note Polyphony
  • Learning Tools:
  • split and duet mode, layer mode
  • PureCF-sampled piano
  • Damper Resonance DSP
  • 88-note, weighted Graded Hammer Standard action
  • 128-Note Polyphony
  • USB Audio (WAV) Recording and Playback
  • AUX Line Input
  • Style Recommender
  • Smart Chord
  • Learning Tools: Y.E.S. (Yamaha Educational Suite) mode and split and dual mode.
  • Acoustic and Intelligence Resonator (AiR) Sound Source
  • Damper Resonance
  • Hammer Response
  • 88-note, Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer action II keyboard
  • 128-note polyphony
  • USB interface (PC) and USB over MIDI
  • Learning Tools:
  • Split and duet mode, layer mode
  • Sustain pedal included
Limitations
  • No MIDI
  • Sustain pedal made of plastic and slides all over the floor. It also does not trigger half-damper effect.
Go to Website
Go to Website
Go to Website

Among the three the Casio PX760 is the best, it has a built-in three pedal board which completes the acoustic piano feel that it is designed to achieve. Functionalities and features are mostly the same.